Anchored learning

"Anchored learning requires putting the students in the context of a problem-based story. This instructional method encourages students to view knowledge (including background knowledge) as tools to be applied to new situations, rather than knowledge as facts to be learned. The students ""play"" an authentic role while investigating the problem and the developing situations. In this framework, the student is given the tools needed to solve the problem. IN AN ANCHORED LEARNING environment, the activities are designed around a realistic situation -- or anchor -- in which there is a problem to be solved by the group. Originally developed by the Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt, this method encourages students to view knowledge as tools to be applied to new situations, rather than knowledge as facts to be learned. Curriculum materials are often technology based, and provide a positive effect on student achievement, including students with special needs. "

Source: Adopted from: http://www.mybrainupgrade.com/047.html

Contextual Use: Mr. Marsh created an anchored learning activity where students were asked to build a mock volcano to demonstrate how an eruption can result in a smoke cloud filled with noxious fumes, similar to what occurred in Iceland.

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